Skip to main content

About your Search

20130216
20130224
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
information we look it up in the book or we googled it instead of buying some old person to ask. state-mandated systems of formal education means that children are taught a particular hours on particular days, our particularly young time -- rather than the older adults of everyday life. finally, the slow pace of technological change in traditional society means that when someone learns there as a child is so useful when the person is old. but the rapid pace of technological change today means that what we learn as children is to longer useful 50 years later. and we older people are not fluent in the technologies center to surviving in modern society. for example, as a 15 year old high school student, i was considered outstandingly good at multiplying a two digit numbers because i memorize the multiplication table and i know how to use logarithm and then click of manipulating slide rule. .. to watch television i have to telephone the 25-year-old son and asking to me through it while i try to push those wretched 41 buttons. [laughter] what can we do to improve the lives of the elderly in
. on sunday night in idaho, i cooking dinner for my kids and with one hand and googling the internet and a desperate hope that i can find something that has been a storytelling that i can present it to my kids and are you for days they get to communicate the civil rights movement. our textbooks are oatmeal, arguments with dave holland and, deliberately trying to make this history and accessible. i didn't do anything. the institute may not be popular here, but it's a very good organization. [laughter] so we've apologize. anyway, these teachers in idaho said, what you don't realize is we are on the low end of the totem pole of your history teacher. school is in the united states are now evaluated by test scores for students and can wish and not, not history. if you're a good history teacher, you're suggesting you might do well to teach english because the school is not evaluated on history. but that a sense of american history, it's impossible to teach citizenship, which is also been wiped out of our curriculum. they say our schools are not go to teach history based bsn we are not trea
'm googling the internet in a desperate hope i can find something that has enough story telling in it that i can present it to my kids in the free or four days we get to try to communicate the civil rights movement. our textbooks are oatmeal. they are arguments with dates all in them, deliberately trying to make this history inaccessible. have i lost my mic? [laughter] i didn't do anything. the institute may not be popular here, but it's a good organization. [laughter] i don't think it deserves -- okay, there. we've apologized to them. anyway, these system teachers in idaho said what you don't realize is that we're on the low end of the totem pole if you're a history teacher. schools in the united states are now evaluated by test scores for students in english and math, not in history. if you're a good history teacher and your principal is suggesting you might do well to teach english because the school is not evaluated on history. without a sense of american history, it's impossible to teach citizenship, which also has been wiped out of our curriculum. so they say our schools are not built
, they might tell their friends, and it's like a google search. it starts kind of bubbling up. thomas payne walked out his front door in philadelphia. he was a imgrant from centerfuges land, but he could think and write clearly, walked out the door and opened 12 shops in 10 blocks and printed common sense in 1776, and it was the harry potter of the late 18th century. [laughter] it helped to ignite the american revolution. well, starting in the last third of the 20th century, television displaced the printing press as the main way we communicate in our democracy. s # -- it had a profound impact. it's not a two-way conversation. the printing press, you get what you want to know and contribute your own ideas. with television, you can talk back to the tv screen, but it doesn't hear you because you're you're -- unless you call if on the c-span show. that's an exception there. my point is mostly it's a one way flow of information, and it's mostly sponsored by large advertisers, but they are increaseingly sponsoring political ideas as well. when they show coal ads on tv, you think they are trying
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)